Health is the top priority

As mentioned previously, at the turn of the century the doctor and nurse who spent a few hours there every week, had to meet their patients and ply their trade under a tree.  There was no building to practice medicine, or to keep their instruments and medicine; just a tree.
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Clinic entrance

 

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Reception

 

The St. Phillip parish provided a building, then funds for medical staff, supplies and diagnostic equipment.  With assistance from another parish they provided an electric generator which was needed to power the equipment.  In the past several years it has grown considerably.  It is now the best medical facility in that part of Haiti; some patients walk several miles to get there.  St. Phillips has committed to ongoing support.
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Weighing in

 

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Lab Tech

 

The clinic has hours 5 days a week and the doctor now visits twice a week.  The current staff includes the head nurse, a nurse / pharmacist, two lab technicians and the receptionist / records keeper.
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Pharmacy

 

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Waiting patiently

 

St. Phillip’s parish pays part of the salaries and pharmaceutical cost.  They also have bought 2 microscopes, beds, IV poles,  and miscellaneous other furniture.  Most patients pay a portion of the expense of office visits and medicine.  Those with no money are not charged.

As Boileau’s Clinic became a reality, the staff quickly realized that the main medical problem was caused by contaminated water.  Their water came from shallow wells and/or creeks and rivers which serve as bathing and cooling facilities for both humans and animals.

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Pumping water from an artesian well.

 

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Busy well by the church.

 

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Carrying water back home

 

St. Phillip quickly decided to provide potable water.  By 2004, 10 artesian wells had been drilled, they now have 15 wells in Boileau and neighboring parishes, providing potable water for 10 to 15 thousand people.  This new supply of good water greatly reduced the number of easily treatable intestinal problems, which cause about 50% of the childhood deaths in Haiti.

The 15 deep wells, which were tested during the 2004 and 2006 visits, provide considerable clean, healthy water

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Testing water quality

 

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Testing water quality

 

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Fetching water

 

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